Please join us in Washington, D.C. or at one of the marches around the country this Saturday, December 13, as we stand in solidarity with thousands of community members, activists, and organizations to march against police violence and demand racial justice.

In Washington, D.C., the National Action Network has organized the National March Against Police Violence, which begins in Freedom Plaza at noon. Faith leaders, community members, regional activists, and national organizations will all begin meeting at 10:30am to prepare to march alongside the families of Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, and Akai Gurley.  

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Black America faces an unspoken agenda of terror and racism. In response, tens of thousands of historically Black congregations/denominations and allies across the country will be wearing black on December 14, 2014, to protest the criminalization, disproportionate incarceration, and killing of black and brown people by law enforcement. As Black lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender (LGBT) religious leaders, we are all too familiar with oppressive systems that discriminate and kill.

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Words cannot begin to describe the depth of feeling we all share about the unfolding tragedies in Ferguson and New York City. Words cannot relieve the suffering of Michael Brown and Eric Garner’s loved ones nor can words alone salve the pain nor quell the anger of millions. It’s action we need and we need it now.
As LGBTQ national organizations, we proudly stand in solidarity with the civil rights organizations and local activists — including the actions of an amazing, fierce, brilliant cadre of youth leaders, many of whom are queer identified — in demanding fundamental systemic change that tackles the root causes of racial and economic injustices once and for all. 

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Since the first cases of HIV were reported over 30 years ago, Black people and our families have been the most impacted. We all carry with us the stories of relatives, friends, neighbors and other loved ones who are no longer with us due to HIV/AIDS. We have collectively allowed stigma, fear and a lack of communication to hinder us from standing up to support our loved ones living with HIV/AIDS. Their cries of despair are ingrained in our memories during a time when most people willingly neglected those living with HIV/AIDS because of ignorance, shame and a lack of compassion. Today, we have made incredible advances in the knowledge and treatment of HIV/AIDS, but too many of us remain silent around the issue. However, our families continue to be the public face of HIV/AIDS.

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Washington, D.C. – The National Black Justice Coalition’s (NBJC) Executive Director & CEO, Sharon Lettman-Hicks, released the following statement in response to the Ferguson, Missouri Grand Jury decision not to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown on August 9, 2014:
 
“I speak as a Black mother of a Black toddler boy who will one day grow up and learn that he lives in a nation where his very existence is a threat. As a parent, I will have to instruct him on how to properly conduct himself in front of law enforcement because one perceived wrong motion or non-submissive remark towards a police officer could serve him to be fatal. I will need to teach him about the legacy of Black lives eliminated due to physical and systematic violence that is too often justified by the law itself...."

 

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