Media Center

NBJC in the News

December 1, 2016 marks the 28th Anniversary of World AIDS Day. The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), the nation's leading civil rights organization dedicated to the empowerment of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) people, including people living with HIV/AIDS, joins with the global community to unite in the fight against HIV, to affirm and support those living with HIV, and to remember those we have lost from the epidemic. This year's World AIDS Day theme for the United States is: * Leadership * Commitment * Impact *.

 

 

 

Read more >

The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), the nation's leading civil rights organization dedicated to the empowerment of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people, joins communities across the nation and world to recognize International Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR). This solemn day has been set aside to honor the lives of our transgender and gender nonconforming family members who are no longer with us due to senseless acts of hate and violence. This day is also set aside to call upon allies to step up and stand in solidarity against this violence. 

Read more >

Annually on Veterans Day, Americans join together to honor, remember, and rededicate ourselves to supporting our nation's veterans for their service to our nation. As we salute our veterans, the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) would like to introduce Rob Smith, a Black, gay Iraq war veteran and author, who will serve the organization as its Ambassador for Veterans Affairs. Over the next year, NBJC and former Private Rob Smith will work to bring light to the critical issues that impact Black LGBTQ veterans and service members in the wake of the repeal of the discriminatory policy: "Don't Ask, Don't Tell." To honor our nation's' veterans, he has written an inspiring opinion piece for TheGrio, A Path Forward for Black LGBTQ Soldiers, on Veterans Day. His article lays out NBJC's public policy agenda to empower our nation's heroes with a special focus on Black LGBTQ veterans and service members.

Read more >

Today is finally election day in America! On this day, millions of Americans will go to the polls to exercise the most fundamental principle of our democratic process: the right to VOTE! At the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), we do not take for granted this paramount right that our ancestors dedicated and often gave their lives to in order for the voices of future generations to be heard. 

Read more >

In honor of National Coming OUT Day, the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), the nation's leading civil rights organization dedicated to the empowerment of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people, is honored to launch the nomination process for the 2017-18 cohort of the 100 Black LGBTQ/SGL Emerging Leaders to Watch (100toWatch). One key pillar to the Emerging Leaders Initiative is the 100 Black LGBTQ/SGL Emerging Leaders to Watch visibility campaign. This group of inspiring leaders will represent a consortium of standout leaders that are ripe with potential and/or deserve a greater platform of exposure.

Read more >

NBJC is honored to announce its HBCU LGBTQ-Equality Initiative Advisory Council Co-chairsBeverly Guy-Sheftall, Ph.D of Spelman College and Anika Simpson, Ph.D. of Morgan State University. The Advisory Council was created to advise and assist NBJC in developing a strategic model that conceptualizes the critical path forward to ensure a welcoming, nurturing and affirming environment at HBCUs for the LGBTQ community.

Read more >

Annually on September 27, we pause and focus on what our communities can collectively do to reduce the disproportionate impact of HIV/AIDS among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) as part of National Gay Men's HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NGMHAAD). According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only 2% of the the US population identifies as gay and bisexual men, but this demographic makes up more than half of the 1.2 million people living with HIV and two-thirds of all new diagnoses, annually, in our nation. If the current trends of new diagnoses continue, 1-in-6 gay and bisexual men will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime, including 1-in-2 Black gay and bisexual men. We must act now to change this alarming trend in our communities!

 

Read more >


In the age of the Obama presidency, our community has witnessed great progress: the passage of federal hate crimes legislation; the repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell and the implementation of open transgender military service; the Supreme Court upheld marriage equality as the law of the land; and the passage of the Affordable Care Act. Unfortunately, we have also experienced many setbacks: the continued negative impact of the criminal justice system on our communities; the rise of overt racism and nationalist militias; the gutting of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and passage of discriminatory state election laws; and the continued rise of HIV/AIDS in our community. With the conference theme, The Post-Obama Era: What's Next?, this year's #OOTH2016 efforts will be deeply rooted in exploring the triumphs and challenges that we have witnessed during the administration of the first Black President, and work to plot the path forward in a post-Obama era.

REGISTER NOW >>

Read more >

On Monday, June 27, 2016, the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), the nation's leading civil rights organization dedicated to the empowerment of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, will join families and communities across the nation on  National HIV Testing Day (NHTD) to highlight the need for Black America to get tested. On this day, we will unite to raise awareness about the importance of HIV testing and early diagnosis of HIV in order for us to live our healthiest lives. We are reminded that we all have the power to serve as change agents for our loved ones by leading by example and getting tested. As the 2016 NHTD theme implores us to Take the Test. Take Control., we ALL have the opportunity to end the spread of HIV and make a difference!

 

Read more >

Fifty years ago today, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act (VRA) of 1965 into law. This historic piece of legislation promised to dismantle the legal barriers that prevented African Americans and other minorities from exercising their right to vote under the U.S. Constitution. By prohibiting racial discrimination in voting practices on every level of government, the Civil Rights Movement achieved one of its primary objectives--all Americans have the right to vote at the ballot box no matter their background.

Read more >