Media Center

NBJC in the News

Black America faces an unspoken agenda of terror and racism. In response, tens of thousands of historically Black congregations/denominations and allies across the country will be wearing black on December 14, 2014, to protest the criminalization, disproportionate incarceration, and killing of black and brown people by law enforcement. As Black lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender (LGBT) religious leaders, we are all too familiar with oppressive systems that discriminate and kill.

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Words cannot begin to describe the depth of feeling we all share about the unfolding tragedies in Ferguson and New York City. Words cannot relieve the suffering of Michael Brown and Eric Garner’s loved ones nor can words alone salve the pain nor quell the anger of millions. It’s action we need and we need it now.
As LGBTQ national organizations, we proudly stand in solidarity with the civil rights organizations and local activists — including the actions of an amazing, fierce, brilliant cadre of youth leaders, many of whom are queer identified — in demanding fundamental systemic change that tackles the root causes of racial and economic injustices once and for all. 

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Since the first cases of HIV were reported over 30 years ago, Black people and our families have been the most impacted. We all carry with us the stories of relatives, friends, neighbors and other loved ones who are no longer with us due to HIV/AIDS. We have collectively allowed stigma, fear and a lack of communication to hinder us from standing up to support our loved ones living with HIV/AIDS. Their cries of despair are ingrained in our memories during a time when most people willingly neglected those living with HIV/AIDS because of ignorance, shame and a lack of compassion. Today, we have made incredible advances in the knowledge and treatment of HIV/AIDS, but too many of us remain silent around the issue. However, our families continue to be the public face of HIV/AIDS.

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On December 2, 2014, the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) will participate in the 3rd Annual#GivingTuesday, a day of giving back. #GivingTuesday is a first of its kind effort to transform how people think about and participate in giving during the holiday season. On this day, charities, families, businesses, community centers, students, retailers and more will all come together to celebrate the act of giving and encourage more, better and smarter giving during the Holiday Season. We need your help!NBJC is asking for you to support Black LGBT/Same-Gender Loving (SGL) justice by giving back on#GivingTuesday.

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It is time to REGISTER for the OUT on the Hill 2014 Black LGBT Leadership Summit.

The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) is a civil rights organization dedicated to empowering Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people as it works to achieve the mission of eradicating racism and homophobia. As America's leading Black LGBT civil rights organization focused on federal public policy, NBJC is hosting the 5th Annual OUT on the Hill Black LGBT Leadership Summit in Washington, DC, September 24-27, 2014.

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Washington, DC -- August 13, 2014 -- Yesterday, NBJC joined national LGBT Equality organizations to pen an open letter of solidarity in response to the tragic death of Michael Brown, an unarmed Black teenager who was shot and killed Saturday by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. Additional details surrounding the shooting are scarce, and the police officials have not provided information as to why the officer shot Brown, or why lethal force was used.

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On Sunday, June 15, The New Black will be shown to a national audience on PBS. Don't miss this incredible film that tells the story of marriage equality through a Black family perspective. From church pews to the streets to kitchen tables, The New Black follows the African-American community as it grapples with the gay rights issue in light of the recent same-sex marriage movement. 

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Washington, D.C. – March 26, 2014 – This week marks the annual LGBTQ Pride Week at Spelman and Morehouse Colleges in Atlanta, Georgia. This year’s theme is “We are Coming Home” and includes a variety of engaging campus events aimed at celebrating the fearless, creative, and resilient spirits of LGBTQ folks of color; promoting the community and alliance building amongst the Atlanta University Consortium’s student body; and most importantly, affirming and taking pride in LGBT identities–-culturally, spiritually, and holistically.

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Our movement for full equality for LGBT people continues to gain momentum. We’ve seen tremendous strides in terms of marriage equality (a total of 17 states now grant the freedom to marry) and most recently with the increased visibility of black LGBT public figures. ButUganda’s current crisis and the close call in Arizona remind us that we must remain vigilant—that despite the many trails being blazed, we are still very much in the heat of the battle and all is not won yet.
Basketball star Jason Collins recently made history as the first openly gay male player in a major sports league when he joined the Brooklyn Nets. Earlier this year, Good Morning America anchor Robin Roberts spoke about her longtime girlfriend for the first time on national television. Trans legends-in-the-making Laverne Cox, breakout actress of the Netflix original series Orange is the New Black, hate crime survivor CeCe McDonald, and New York Times bestselling author Janet Mock are leading the national conversation around transgender equality.

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While the America we live in today is more tolerant and accepting than decades and centuries past, we still have a long and arduous road ahead. Despite false claims that we live in a "post-racial" society, African Americans still face prejudice and systemic racism regularly. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people still combat discrimination and are denied access to basic protections. When you exist at these intersectional identities, simply trying to provide for yourself and your family becomes a battlefield.
At the National Black Justice Coalition, we have been fighting for over a decade to help LGBT African Americans live fully empowered, authentic lives. We know that Black LGBT people can struggle to find acceptance not only in mainstream America, but also within their own LGBT and African American communities. Now we have the figures to back up what we witness firsthand daily.

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