Politics isn't always pretty. In fact, it can get downright nasty. When you work on issues that directly affect people's lives, it's easy for passion to overcome politeness. That said, there are some lines you just don't cross.

Recently, on Tallahassee radio station WFLA, Florida Family Policy Council president John Stemberger crossed one of the most basic lines we have: racism. 

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Washington, DC -- August 13, 2014 -- Yesterday, NBJC joined national LGBT Equality organizations to pen an open letter of solidarity in response to the tragic death of Michael Brown, an unarmed Black teenager who was shot and killed Saturday by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. Additional details surrounding the shooting are scarce, and the police officials have not provided information as to why the officer shot Brown, or why lethal force was used.

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For almost five decades, I have marched, mobilized, and advocated on behalf of my Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) and same-gender-loving (SGL) community. As a southern Black lesbian and a social justice activist, I have witnessed, firsthand, how Black LGBT/SGL people are too often left out of our national agenda, and I have worked tirelessly to carve out a significant space to address our needs. In 2003, I co-founded the National Black Justice Coalition when the radical right was exploiting African American religious and civil rights leaders to oppose marriage equality. 

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Washington, DC -- The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) joins the call for the organizers of the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival (MWMF) to end their informal policy of not welcoming transgender women to participate in the international, all women music festival. Birthed out of the feminist movement of the late twentieth century, MWMF has provided an exclusive space built by and for women since 1976. This weeklong music and community festival, located in a small wooded area of Hart, Michigan, has maintained a policy that only women who were assigned female at birth should attend. 

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Washington, DC — Today marks the 49th anniversary since President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (VRA). Spurred by the groundwork of Freedom Summer and the horrific events of Bloody Sunday, the VRA was an unapologetic answer by the federal government to southern states that were blocking the voting rights of Black Americans. Ratified in 1867, the 15th Amendment of the United States Constitution provided that the right to vote “shall not be denied or abridged” on the basis of race. For nearly 100 years after its ratification, white state officials illegally denied Blacks, and other people of color, from voting even with federal anti-discrimination laws on the books.

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