Safe & Inclusive Schools

Our Issues: Interview with the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC)

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AfroPunk recently sat down with Spelman alumnus and NBJC Programs and Outreach Associate Je-ShawnaWholley to discuss the founding of the organization, influencing policy, experiences of queer Black people on Historically Black College and University as well as predominantly white college campuses, and what “queer” looks like in a modern context.

By: Justin Allen, AFROPUNK Contributor | April 9, 2013 | AFROPUNK.com

The State of Black LGBT in Black History Month

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In honor of Black History Month, NBJC Executive Director Sharon Lettman-Hicks appeared on Sheila Alexander-Reid Live, hosted by D.C. activist Sheila Alexander-Reid. Lettman-Hicks discussed the state of the Black LGBT movement, Obama's inaugural address, Bayard Rustin's legacy and more. Sheila Alexander-Reid Live is D.C.'s only LGBT FM radio show. The program offers an LGBT perspective on an array of topics. 

In honor of Black History Month, NBJC Executive Director Sharon Lettman-Hicks appeared on Sheila Alexander-Reid Live, hosted by D.C. activist Sheila Alexander-Reid. Lettman-Hicks discussed the state of the Black LGBT movement, Obama's inaugural address, Bayard Rustin's legacy and more. Sheila Alexander-Reid Live is D.C.'s only LGBT FM radio show.

EVENT: Black LGBT Emerging Leaders Day, Feb. 21-22, 2013

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The National Black Justice Coalition, in conjunction with the Human Rights Campaign and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, is pleased to host the 2013 Black LGBT Emerging Leaders Day in Washington, DC. Select events will take place on February 21-22, 2013. Participants will hear about President Obama’s commitment to equal rights for all Americans and the important steps his Administration has taken to ensure health, well-being, security, justice, and equality for black and LGBT Americans.

 

Arcus Foundation Encourages Donations to Grantees on Giving Tuesday

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One of the grantees, National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), launched a fundraising drive for an initiative aimed at creating the next generation of Black LGBT activists and leaders in the United States. The NBJC initiative identifies rising stars aged 18-30 in the Black LGBT movement and provides them a platform to develop their leadership abilities, use their voices, build networks, and take action in their communities. "Giving Tuesday is an opportunity to raise awareness about the importance of young people of color in shaping U.S. Policies and in sustaining a vibrant and impactful equality movement," said Sharon J. Lettman-Hicks, NBJC's Executive Director, noting a blog about Giving Tuesday by NBJC emerging leader Je-Shawna Wholley.

NEW YORK – 27 November, 2012: The Arcus Foundation has been encouraging donors across the United States to contribute to charitable activities on November's national day of giving known as Giving Tuesday.

In advance of Giving Tuesday, the Foundation awarded a raft of small grants, amounting to US$78,275, to 11 organizations strongly allied to its mission of creating a just and humane world that respects the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals, and respects and protects the world’s great apes.

#GivingTuesday: Why I #GIVE2NBJC and So Should You

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Most recently, NBJC has launched the Black LGBT Emerging Leaders Initiative, an intentional effort to create more programs and sponsorship opportunities dedicated to empowering and mobilizing young Black LGBT leaders between the ages of 18 and 30.  This sense of responsibility has led me to spearhead a signature initiative for NBJC by spreading the word about the importance of giving back on Giving Tuesday, November 27, and beyond.  Giving Tuesday is a national campaign with hundreds of charities, organizations and non-profits purposed to celebrate and encourage more giving during the holiday season.

“Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.” — President Barack Obama.

We Won't Solve Problems Confronting Our Community Without a Group Effort

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One sunny afternoon last week, Darnell "Dynasty" Young, fresh from a wardrobe change that involved black tights and a tight red top, told a crowd of supporters at American Legion Mall that he was dedicating his rally to "all of the bullied kids" who felt so alone that they killed themselves.
Darnell could've easily become one of those kids without the support of his mother and twin brother.
Hearing his words, dozens of mostly gay and white people cheered and waved rainbow flags.
Dynasty burst into tears.
Skinny, effeminate and sporting a mohawk, 17-year-old Dynasty is a bullied kid. His story is as sad and as unjust as any child's who is bullied for being somehow different from the norm.
But Dynasty isn't just any bullied kid. He's a gay bullied kid. He's a kid who gets beat up because he's gay, carries purses and wears his mom's jewelry.

One sunny afternoon last week, Darnell "Dynasty" Young, fresh from a wardrobe change that involved black tights and a tight red top, told a crowd of supporters at American Legion Mall that he was dedicating his rally to "all of the bullied kids" who felt so alone that they killed themselves.

Darnell could've easily become one of those kids without the support of his mother and twin brother.

Hearing his words, dozens of mostly gay and white people cheered and waved rainbow flags.

Dynasty burst into tears.

Bullied Black Gay Teen Facing Explusion

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Don Lemon talks to teen "Dynasty" Young, who's facing expulsion after bringing a stun gun to school to ward off bullies. Dynasty's mother, Chelisa Grimes, stands in full support of her gay son.  According to a report conducted by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), more than 80% of LGBT students of color reported hearing the word “gay” used in a negative way, such as the expressions “that’s so gay” or “you’re so gay,” often or frequently in school. Approximately one quarter of African American (22%) students like Dynasty had missed at least one full day of school in the past month because they felt unsafe or uncomfortable.

Don Lemon talks to teen "Dynasty" Young, who's facing expulsion after bringing a stun gun to school to ward off bullies. Dynasty's mother, Chelisa Grimes, stands in full support of her gay son.