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Washington, DC – Today, the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) joined the call for Michigan lawmakers to include protections for transgender people in legislation to expand the state’s non-discrimination law. Michigan’s current non-discrimination law, known as the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act, was passed in 1976 and banned discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations based on race, sex, religion, age, height, weight, marital or family status, and national origin. An updated non-discrimination bill was introduced this week in the Michigan House of Representatives to protect against discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, but failed to include protections on the basis of gender identity or gender expression.

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Washington, DC -- The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) celebrates the nomination of United States Attorney Loretta Lynch to be the nation’s 83rd Attorney General. Lynch is currently the top federal prosecutor of the Eastern District of New York, which includes Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and Long Island. If confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Lynch would become the first Black woman to serve as the nation’s top law enforcement official, following the historic tenure of current Attorney General Eric Holder.

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Washington, DC -- The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) joins the call for the organizers of the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival (MWMF) to end their informal policy of not welcoming transgender women to participate in the international, all women music festival. Birthed out of the feminist movement of the late twentieth century, MWMF has provided an exclusive space built by and for women since 1976. This weeklong music and community festival, located in a small wooded area of Hart, Michigan, has maintained a policy that only women who were assigned female at birth should attend. 

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Washington, DC — Today marks the 49th anniversary since President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (VRA). Spurred by the groundwork of Freedom Summer and the horrific events of Bloody Sunday, the VRA was an unapologetic answer by the federal government to southern states that were blocking the voting rights of Black Americans. Ratified in 1867, the 15th Amendment of the United States Constitution provided that the right to vote “shall not be denied or abridged” on the basis of race. For nearly 100 years after its ratification, white state officials illegally denied Blacks, and other people of color, from voting even with federal anti-discrimination laws on the books.

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Washington, DC—July 21, 2014 – Today, President Obama signed an Executive Order to ban federal contractors from discriminating in the workplace based on their employee’s sexual orientation or gender identity. This Executive Order is the single largest expansion of LGBT workplace protections in the nation’s history, protecting one-fifth of the entire U.S. labor force. According to the Williams Institute at UCLA Law School, President Obama’s action is estimated to extend protections to about 14 million workers whose employers or states currently do not have such nondiscrimination policies.

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Washington, DC -- June 17, 2014 – Today, the Senate confirmed Attorney Staci Yandle and Judge Darrin Gayles to become federal judges on the U.S. District Courts in Illinois and Florida, respectively. Ms. Yandle, a practicing attorney for over 20 years, will be the second Black, openly lesbian judge confirmed to the federal bench. Judge Gayles will become the nation’s first Black, openly gay male to serve on the federal bench. Both nominees received overwhelming support from the Senate during their confirmation votes: Ms. Yandle was confirmed by a vote of 52 to 44, and Judge Gayles was confirmed by a vote of 98 to 0.

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Washington, DC—June 16, 2014Today, the White House announced President Obama’s intention to sign an executive order that could protect as many as 16 million workers, or one-fifth of the entire U.S. labor force, by prohibiting all companies who contract with the federal government from discriminating on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation. The signing of this executive order is the single largest expansion of LGBT workplace protections in the nation’s history. 

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The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) honors the life and legacy of Dr. Maya Angelou, who passed away this morning at her home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina at the age of 86. She was a teacher, dancer, artist, poet, activist, and most importantly, a phenomenal woman who taught the world how to live their authentic truth by embracing both tragedies and triumphs in life. 

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Washington, DC – Yesterday, Donald Sterling, the embattled owner of the LA Clippers, sat down for an interview with CNN’s Anderson Cooper to attempt damage control after a recording of racist rants by him were leaked to the media two weeks ago. In the interview with CNN, Sterling went back and forth, sporadic at times, denying that he is a racist. But the most egregious part of the interview came when Sterling blasted NBA Hall of Famer and businessman, Earvin “Magic” Johnson. 

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Washington, DC - April 10, 2014 - Today, The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), America's leading Black LGBT civil rights organization focused on federal public policy, recognizes the second annual "National Youth HIV & AIDS Awareness Day" (NYHAAD).NYHAAD is a day to educate the public about the impact of HIV and AIDS on young people as well as highlight the amazing work young people are doing across the country to fight the HIV and AIDS epidemic. 

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